Moorrinya National Park

In the heart of the Desert Uplands, Moorrinya National Park protects 18 land types in the Lake Eyre Basin, one of Australia’s most important water catchments. This remote park has dry, flat plains criss-crossed by watercourses and covered in open eucalypt, paperbark and acacia woodlands and grasslands. Camping is available in a remote and undeveloped setting.

Location: About 386km south-west of Townsville. 180km north of Aramac on the Aramac Torrens Creek Road

Access: Via Aramac Torrens Creek Road

In the heart of the Desert Uplands, Moorrinya National Park protects 18 land types in the Lake Eyre Basin, one of Australia’s most important water catchments. This remote park has dry, flat plains criss-crossed by watercourses and covered in open eucalypt, paperbark and acacia woodlands and grasslands. Camping is available in a remote and undeveloped setting.

Getting there

The park turnoff is approximately 106km north-east of

From Townsville, travel south-west for 296km to Torrens Creek on the Flinders Highway. Moorrinya National Park is about 90km south of Torrens Creek on the Aramac Torrens Creek Road. If travelling from the south, the park is 180km north of Aramac, on the Aramac Torrens Creek Road. A directional sign marks the entrance to the park.

Access to the Shirley Shearing Shed camping area is marked by directional signs. From the entrance on the Aramac Torrens Creek Road, the track crosses Bullock Creek and travels for 6.5km through acacia and bluegrass communities. Turn right, just past the Shirley Homestead and travel 4.5km to a Y intersection. The camping area is 4.3km along the right-hand side road.

Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended to access the camping area as the tracks are rough and become impassable to conventional vehicles after rain. Vehicle access is not maintained within the stock route. The park may be closed during the wet season (November to April). Check with the Department of Transport and Main Roads for road conditions and the Bureau of Meteorology for local weather information.

Park features

Moorrinya National Park protects 32,607 ha and is located in the heart of the Desert Uplands, protecting 18 vegetation communities in the Lake Eyre Basin, one of Australia’s most important catchments.

This remote park has dry, flat plains criss-crossed by watercourses and covered in open eucalypt, paperbark and acacia woodlands and grasslands. Moorrinya is a wildlife refuge, protecting Australian icons such as kangaroos, koalas, emus and dingoes, as well as threatened species such as the square-tailed kite, squatter pigeon (southern subspecies) and the Julia Creek Dunnart.

Moorrinya National Park was initially established as the sheep grazing property, Shirley Station. In the late 1970s, cattle replaced sheep and grazing continued until the park was established in 1993. Much of the sheep station infrastructure, dating back to the late 1940s, remains as a reminder of the spirit and hard work of the people who lived in this remote part of Queensland.

camping

Moorrinya National Park was originally Shirley Station until 1993 when the area was declared a national park

things to do

Things to know before you go